Monday, May 20, 2019

Federal judge sides with House Democrats over subpoena for Trump’s financial records

Federal judge sides with House Democrats over subpoena for Trump’s financial records
Excerpt from Judge Mehta's ruling:
"Courts have grappled for more than a century with the question of the scope of Congress’s investigative power. The binding principle that emerges from these judicial decisions is that courts must presume Congress is acting in furtherance of its constitutional responsibility to legislate and must defer to congressional judgments about what Congress needs to carry out that purpose. To be sure, there are limits on Congress’s investigative authority. But those limits do not substantially constrain Congress. It is simply not fathomable that a Constitution that grants Congress the power to remove a President for reasons including criminal behavior would deny Congress the power to investigate him for unlawful conduct—past or present—even without formally opening an impeachment inquiry."
Read the full opinion here
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Judge rules against Trump in fight over president’s financial records
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US mitigates Huawei ban by offering temporary reprieve

US mitigates Huawei ban by offering temporary reprieve
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Chinese tech giant Huawei has developed its own operating system as a 'plan B' in case it's barred by the US government from using Google and Microsoft products

Microsoft wants a US privacy law that puts the burden on tech companies

Microsoft wants a US privacy law that puts the burden on tech companies
GDPR’s first anniversary: A year of progress in privacy protection

Supreme Court Rules In Favor Of Native American Rights In Wyoming Hunting Case

Supreme Court Rules In Favor Of Native American Rights In Wyoming Hunting Case

New Hope-Solebury Wins Seatbelt Challenge

New Hope-Solebury Wins Seatbelt Challenge